Gee-Haw Whimmy-Diddles and Other Non-Fiction Casualties O’ the Day

It’s not every day that a King’s bones are dug up.  So let’s celebrate with some bones we dug out of our non-fiction collection today!

Preface: I’ve been in my department head position for almost a year and a half.  I made a conscious effort not to kick off any big weeding projects until I had been on the job for a full year so I could get a good sense of our patrons and what the community was digging.  Now that I have a sense of things, we’re off to the races! While my colleagues do a brilliant job of all the nitty-gritty work, I take a quick pass through everything before it goes out the door.  I present to you the top casualties of the day.

Something about this super-jacked half rabbit/half man makes me cock my head in confusion. Same with the wolf/human and his spectacles.
Perhaps an ancestor of James Marshall’s Portly McSwine?
Copyright 1973!!! Note the author: I guess this is what Mr Green was up to pre-Looking For Alaska. This is essentially a compendium of Canadian Sasquatch sitings. I’ll be taking this treatise next time I head into the deep bush, for sure.

 

And, finally, the book that gave this post its name:

This little gem hasn’t circulated in 15 years. WHY THE HECK NOT!?

I am in love with this book.  My favorite excerpt:

Don’t hook this book

My young whippernap,

For nickels and dimes

It cost-ed my pap.

Don’t know if that qualifies as a whimmy-diddle or not.

I think it’s also worth noting that the author, a Mr. James Still, has a bio in the back of the book that says “Critics have hailed his verse and fiction for its beauty, humor, and integrity.”

And keeping with our old bones theme, I give you my favorite Grade 7 slow dance jam.

The Biebs and Ivan Connection: My (Serious) 2013 Newbery Insight

For the sake of clarity: this post is about making the connection between two very talented people from different spheres (Katherine Applegate and Justin Bieber) and how social media has contributed to the buzz about those talents.  It is not a post about calling into question these people’s talents (even if Justin Bieber isn’t your cup of tea, he writes songs, plays several instruments and is a pretty dang good singer while bouncing around on stage).

I do not think Katherine Applegate won a Newbery because of Twitter.  I think she won one because she is extremely, undeniably talented.  Same thing with Bieber: I don’t think he wins awards because of Twitter.  I think he wins them because he is also talented.

While anyone can, of course, disagree with my opinions on what constitutes talent, I want to make it clear that this post is about observing a tremendously positive, exciting change in the way readers are celebrating books for young people on social media.  I think Twitter has changed the level of excitement about the Newbery in a very good way.  I do not think Twitter had anything to do with the fact that a very deserving book – The One and Only Ivan – won the Newbery.  No matter the state of technology when it was published, Ivan would have won.  I really believe that. So…

Stay with me on this one.

So in November, Oprah interviewed Justin Bieber and commented that he is like no other celebrity in history because of social media.  Essentially she says (and quite smartly, I think) that Biebs can’t really be considered on the same level as Elvis or The Beatles or even Michael Jackson because of the role that Twitter played in his rise to success.

Y’all, I think the same thing happened to The One and Only Ivan this year.  It’s a Newbery game changer.

I don’t have Photoshop. Can you tell?

To my knowledge, this is the first time there has ever been a real concentrated rallying around a particular Newbery contender on Twitter.  Sure, there have been predictions and fan favorites and things, but nothing like what Mr. Schu and Colby Sharp started; from Twitter chats to vlogging to hashtagging ’round the clock, I’d say there was a definite Ivan movement. In 2011, there certainly wasn’t a Moon Over Manifest movement as no one had read the dang thing.  And while I remember tons of buzz around When You Reach Me for the 2010 prize, I don’t think there was the kind of mobilization that there was with Ivan. And in January 2009, only the really cool kids were on Twitter.

To further my point, has a Newbery award winner ever thought of a blogger(s) immediately after hearing the news of winning the award?

And has a Newbery award winner ever thanked a Twitter community or blogger(s) in their acceptance speech?  Not that I know of, and I’ll betcha my little blue bowler hat that’s gonna happen come Chicago.

It’s the future, folks. Let’s celebrate with this song from The Jetsons movie that, when I was eight years old, considered THE MOST ROMANTIC THING OF ALL TIME.

 

Post-ALA Midwinter Depression Spiral? Follow These 5 Easy Steps

Blurg.

That’s the sound of post-conference blues.  You’re overtired and feeling wired and crazed and still blinking from the Youth Media Awards light show and you come home and realize that you don’t have any eggs to hard-boil for breakfast and your favorite tights need washing and…BLURG.

Well, that’s how I was feeling Wednesday morning on my second day back at work post-ALA Midwinter.  But then I did some things that put a bit of the pep back in my pants.  If you’re having a D in the D (down in the dumps) day, follow my patented program.

Tip 1: Put Up Those Posters

For the most part, I’m an anti-swag person.  I hate lugging a bunch of stuff home and I live in fear of becoming one of those insane rolling suitcase librarians in the exhibits.  But I have started a nice little poster collection in my office and scored two additions this past weekend.  Behold, Olivia, matching perfectly with my office’s pink walls (yes, I have a boss that let me paint my office pink.  Though I originally tried for something more of the Pepto-Bismol variety but that was vetoed).

Don’t worry, those creases work themselves out over time.

I also made a bold statement by throwing this one for Lane Smith’s Abe Lincoln’s Dream right on the front of my office door.  This is a no-Confederate zone, y’all!

You know what people are going to think when they see this? Fancy.

Tip 2: Put a book you love (but many don’t know or under-love) up on display

My pick was Hamsters Holding Hands by Kass Reich, published by BC’s own Orca Books.  If this doesn’t cheer you up, you have major problems.  There is a HAMSTER holding a BALLOON ANIMAL.  Alternatively, you can put all the award winners from Monday up on display too for bonus points.

And remember this?

Tip 3: Weed Something Ghastly

Like this! Wheezy – a story about a little English boy with asthma published in 1988.

My favorite page is below where the little dude asks “Please could I have some of those leaflets for my asthma scrapbook?”  Then he joins “the Saturday Swimming Club for children with asthma” (YES, this is actually what it is called) and everything is hunky dory.  He probably grew up just fine.  I actually weeded this today, guys.  No jokes.

Tip 4: Order Those Winners You Missed

White Bicycle. ‘Nuff said (and it’s apparently third in a trilogy?! That’s gotta be some other record/gasp-worthy thing).

Tip 5: Have Someone Call You a Unicorn

I was helping out with a real reference question doozie on the desk when my girl Saundra sent me this email.  A good reminder of the power of a shout-out and what a boost it is to get compliments from colleagues.  Made my day and something I want to do more often for others.

And, if all else fails, pump some 90s jams.  I blasted this all the way home.  Just go ahead now.

um….(2013 ALA Youth Media Awards gasps and more)

BEST THING EVER.

That was Jon Klassen’s Twitter reaction to pulling a total Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen style Caldecott move by snagging both an honor and the medal at the ALA Youth Media Awards this morning.  As Uncle Jesse would say “Haaaave Mercy!”

Shannon Ozirny: Psychic

Now I know tons of people made actual predictions that came true, but I would just like to point y’all back to a little tweet I busted out 12 days ago:

That’s right.  Now, Three Time Lucky only got a Newbery Honor, but this makes me at least 1/2 psychic.

Freaking Out

This was my very first time attending the awards.  It was 14 hours ago and I still kinda feel like this.  It was beyond exciting.

I think the biggest thrill was Beverley Brenna winning a Printz Honor for White Bicycle.  I thought the name sounded familiar, and after some quick Googling, I confirmed that she is from Saskatchewan!  Me too!

Things That Make You Go…Gasp!

There were some particularly cray moments this morning for reals.  Gonna bust out the bullets for this one:

  • No Printz love for The Fault in Our Stars.  How does a book with a million starred reviews and a Time review quote of “Damn near genius” get jack?  Beats me.
  • No Illustration Honors for the Pura Belpre. Zip.
  • No Schneider love for Wonder.
  • An Artemis Fowl book got an Odyssey award.  I don’t know about you, but I haven’t said the words “Artemis Fowl” since about 2009.

Me Being an Idiot

The funny thing about conferences is that you are so busy running around and squealing when you run into people that you forget to eat.  This happened to me on Saturday.  Then I hit the sauce a bit and repeatedly called Kirby Larson “Clare.”  As in Clare Vanderpool.  Kirby is seriously the most gracious, upbeat, kind, wonderful person you will ever meet so she didn’t seem to mind at all, but STILL.  At least I was confusing her with another amazing Newbery talent and wasn’t calling her Francine Pascal or Lauren Conrad.

#1 Pal Award

Finally, a big shout-out to my ride or die pal Travis of 100 Scope Notes for hassling me (in a nice way) to get back in the saddle with my blog.  I bounced the majority of my tweets off of him this weekend and also about 93% of the content of this blog post after the ceremony, so if you’re digging it, you can thank him.  Travis followed me on Twitter back in the day when I had about 60 followers and he, along with the indefatigable ray of sunshine that is Mr. Schu, have been so supportive and made me feel utterly welcome at my first ALA conference back in Anaheim.  If it weren’t for the good people at Random House and the amazing Kate McClelland and Kathy Krasniewicz Memorial Scholarship that I won last year, I’m not sure that I would have made it to ALA and made some great friends.  So good stuff all around.

And in my perennial efforts to bring Jay-Z into everything, I give you this music-less tribute to Jay-Z’s favorite headwear, the Yankee cap.  I’m sure if anyone took it from him, he would go loco on them Klassen style (the best part is the random dudes they intersperse where you’re all “That’s not HOVA.”)

A Better Reason to Mock Lauren Conrad

Yes!  LC is back in the news! Ya heard she went all Edward Scissorhands on Snicket, yes?

Behold this awesome photo I threw together in library school using Microsoft Word, cut and paste and alotta heart (I don’t have Photoshop, obvs).

It’s not the kind of thing I should probably admit publicly, but I have seen every single episode of Laguna Beach, The Hills and The City.  We all have our vices.

Okay, full disclosure: I also own a Lauren Conrad for Kohl’s white blazer.  That I wore today (seriously). But it was a cute outfit! I’m going to go take a picture of it right now to prove it to you.

I have a deep and complex love/hate relationship with Lauren Conrad that is mostly hate.  I used to tweet about it a lot way back in ’09.  Even Heidi and Spencer were following me for awhile (if you don’t know who those people are, you are richer for it). I also wrote an unnecessarily long paper about Lauren Conrad and transmedia in library school.  This involved having to read L.A. Candy.  Thankfully only the first book of the trilogy was out at the time.

When I was researching the paper,  I read a lot about Lauren’s views on writing.  I got to thinking afterwards – who is the antithesis of Lauren Conrad when it comes to words of wisdom on writing for young people?  The answer is Katherine Paterson.  Duh. And this blog post was born.

The most annoying thing about Lauren Conrad is not the fact that she cut up perfectly good books.  The most annoying thing about her is that she seems to take herself really seriously as a writer. She talks about her “process” and all this other nonsense when she is really a celebrity with a ghost writer.  I think that, when you are a reality television start turned author, you either have to own up to the fact about that you have a ghostwriter and/or formally acknowledge them (a la Hilary Duff) or be so drunk and crazy all the time that you never talk about your own book seriously (a la Snookie)

So let’s make fun of Lauren for being a pretentious wannabe writer.

Then you can make fun of me for buying a Lauren Conrad blazer.

Then we will all get what we deserve.

Sad.

All this joyful crying at the Olympics got me thinking: why not take a tearful look back at the last seven months to see just how many books have made me cry?  It’s only three so it won’t be too painful.

I should preface this by saying that I’m not a big crier while reading.  So 2012 has been a particularly productive year thus far.

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler.  Illustrations by Maira Kalman

Did this book make me cry out of sadness?  No.  Oh no. This book made me cry out of pure, unfiltered rage.  Is there anyone I hate more in this world than Ed Slaterton?  Probably not.

To counter the sadness and rage blackout, this Amazon interview with Handler and Kalman brings the LOLs.  I love how awkward the whole thing is with the interviewer and am especially tickled by their description of the “working process” that starts around 5:10.

The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

Who doesn’t cry reading this book?  I mean, really.  The interesting thing about TFIOS is that it has a major Charlotte’s Web effect on me.  That means that I can be anywhere, doing anything, and reading the last line of the book will put tears in my eyes.  I was trying to pester our Summer Reading Club assistant into reading TFIOS and actually got damp peepers in front of her when I flipped to the back page.  And it convinced her to check out the book!  Note to librarians: teary eyes sell books.  And make you look like a crazypants.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness. Inspired by an idea from Siobhan Dowd. Illustrations by Jim Kay.

Hoo boy, I have never, never cried so hard reading.  I literally had to put down the book, take off my glasses and put my head in my hands and sob.  That was followed by crying steadily for the last 40 pages.  It is such an exquisite, articulate, seemingly effortless portrayal of loss and self-doubt and fear.  Brilliant.

And you know, while we’re on this whole sad theme, let me also share the only book trailer to ever make me cry.  This is the trailer for Pussycat, Pussycat, Where Have You Been? by Dan Bar-el with illustrations by Rae Maté.

WHAT IF THE CAT NEVER CAME BACK!?! Oh, it makes me so sad.

And just for good measure, the movie that has made me cry the most is a bit of a shocker so I’ll throw it in here too.  It’s completely ridiculous, but I bawled through most of District 9.  I was so, so, so concerned for that little alien baby!  Thank goodness for the internet, because someone has made a bad quality clip montage of the alien baby with “Dust In the Wind” in the background! YES!

Every Day by David Levithan

Every Day by David Levithan. Random House. On sale August 28, 2012. Reviewed from ALA ARC.

You wanna know what makes a quality young adult romance?  One that really sticks out from the pack and just kicks you right in the nuts of your heart?

INCONVENIENCE.

That’s right.  There is no romance more exciting to read than one that centres around really inconvenient love.  Figuring out how to love someone when you both have cancer? Inconvenient. Deciding whether or not you should return to consciousness post-auto accident for your boyfriend?  Super inconvenient.  Trying to love someone you thought was a girl but then turned out to be a boy? Definitely not on the list of the top ten most convenient things.

Of course, those three scenarios refer to some of my recent favorite lurve-themed YA books: John Green’s The Fault In Our Stars, Gayle Forman’s If I Stay and Brian Katcher’s Almost Perfect. They are brilliant in different ways (and of course deal with many other themes beyond love), but all feature characters who must really, seriously give ‘er to earn what their heart desires.  I think this theme of inconvenient love is so powerful that it can even carry a the book in the absence of really terrible writing (see: Twilight).

But what does all this talk of inconvenience have to do with David Levithan’s new book, Every Day?  It is officially one of the most inconvenient cases of love I have ever had the pleasure of reading.  The book’s main character, simply called A, wakes up in the body of a different person every day.  The body might belong to a male or female, a straight, gay or bisexual person, a person of any race – the only consistency is that all the bodies belong to sixteen-year-old people.  This is all going along fine until A meets Rhiannon.  A falls in love with Rhiannon.  And then things get SUPER INCONVENIENT.  Because how can you love someone when you have a different body every day? How the heck can that possibly work?

It’s a conundrum and a half, and that is why Every Day is so addictive.  As readers, we want to find out how someone in such an impossibly difficult, inconvenient situation could make it work.  Because if some genderless being with no body can make it work in love, then certainly we all have a shot, right?

This novel is not only exceptional in its premise, but in the brilliant points it subtly makes about the fluidity and elusive nature of gender.  Is this the first YA romance featuring a protagonist with no assigned gender?  I think so.  And that is a really big deal.  When this book inevitably becomes a Hollywood blockbuster, I just hope that A remains genderless, and we don’t discover at the end that the character’s “true” form is actually Taylor Lautner. Or Selena Gomez.  Or the dog from The Artist.

And, like every David Levithan book, Every Day is dripping with descriptions of emotions and feelings that are normally impossible to put into words.  I swear that there is something on every page of his books that I want to have printed on a t-shirt so I can run out into the street and shout “This is exactly how I feel!  Don’t you ever feel like this too!?”

If the human heart had a spokesperson, if would be David Levithan.

No offense, Maya Angelou.